My instrument is called the Maraca. Both of my parents helped me make it. First we went to Home Depot to get the pieces. We bought 3" PVC and a half inch round dowel.

When we got home my Dad cut the PVC with his circular saw and then drilled a half inch hole in the bottom of the PVC pipe. Then Mom and I cut the dowel about 8 inches long and glued the dowel to the half inch hole in the PVC.

Then I cut a soup can and used the top and bottom of the can. This will help in making the sound for my maraca.

My Mom and I measured and cut two round pieces of black leather and then glued the flat soup tops to the leather. Then we glued one leather piece to the PVC.

After it was dry, we put small stones inside and then glued the other round piece of leather to the other side. I cut a leather belt and my Dad punched holes into the belt.

Then we glued sequins in the holes to add decoration. After the sequins dried I glued the belt around the Maraca. I also added a leather strip to the handle for decoration. Now it's done.

 

I can make different sounds with my Maraca. I can hit it on my hand and it makes a hard deep noise. If I shake it back and forth it makes a lighter echoing sound. I can also pat my hand against the leather top like a drum. But instead of making a drum sound the rocks bounce against the metal inside making a tin sound.

I can make it louder or softer depending on how hard or light I shake it. And the tempo can be changed with how fast or slow I shake it.

I looked up the history of maracas on the Internet with my Mom's help. We found out that maracas originated in South America. They were made from dried gourd shells that contained beans or beads with a handle for shaking. Today maracas are used in Latin American style music such as Jazz. And sometimes they are used in classical music.

I enjoyed making this instrument because it gave me something to do with my parents. I also had fun making it and learning about maracas.

 

I can make different sounds with my Maraca. I can hit it on my hand and it makes a hard deep noise. If I shake it back and forth it makes a lighter echoing sound. I can also pat my hand against the leather top like a drum. But instead of making a drum sound the rocks bounce against the metal inside making a tin sound.

I can make it louder or softer depending on how hard or light I shake it. And the tempo can be changed with how fast or slow I shake it.

I looked up the history of maracas on the Internet with my Mom's help. We found out that maracas originated in South America. They were made from dried gourd shells that contained beans or beads with a handle for shaking. Today maracas are used in Latin American style music such as Jazz. And sometimes they are used in classical music.

I enjoyed making this instrument because it gave me something to do with my parents. I also had fun making it and learning about maracas.